Myriad Forum « Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique »
 Welcome, Guest.
 You can read all messages, but to be able to post,
 please Login or Register.
Nov 18th, 2017, 5:07pm 
   Myriad Forum
   Gold Sound Database
(Moderator: Forum Administrator)
   Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1  Reply | Notify of replies | Print
   Author  Topic: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  (Read 2616 times)
muddle
Board Senior Member
****





   


Posts: 336
Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique   Orchestral_Harp.mui
« on: May 23rd, 2011, 3:11am »
Quote | Modify

The Harp instrument attached comes from a free internet  sound font.   I have no idea what the original source was.
 
Sorry for delay in putting it here, but I thought I should adjust the decay and release to match an old video I recorded, in which a harp player is demonstrating.  
It turned out when she played a strong chord the sound was still fading away after 10 secs.     I have not set this  quite so long!  
She relied on her hands to damp the strings when changing harmonies.  
 
 The other setting is the release of the sound.  It could be made  short to sound the same as when she damped the strings, but it then sounded rather dull when playing short notes.  
 So I have left a slowish release which seems to give a good flowing sound when doing an arpeggio passage but doesn't go on for the full fading time unless you use very long notes or extend the note pressure time.  
Hope its okay.   Best to try and see how it works.  
 
It's  a small file so is not  compressed.  
A bit of chorus and  reverb. are set on . Seems to enhance the harp tone.  
The advanced velocity filter is set on too, but only make a little difference.
 
cheers.  David L.
 
offline

You tube videos using HA or Virtual Singers:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheMuddleglum/videos
Tremolo
Board Master
*****





   
WWW |

Gender: male
Posts: 1589
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #1 on: May 23rd, 2011, 9:53am »
Quote | Modify

Beautiful sound....
 
Thank you very much, David!
offline

www.facebook.com/alimproviste.musique.classique
http://www.chantautourdelimprovisation.fr
http://www.youtube.com/user/69tenor
Carte Forum Myriad
http://www.mindmeister.com/fr/88262803/myriad-fr
Ramses12
Board Senior Member
****






  Ramses12_gmc@yahoo.com  


Gender: male
Posts: 298
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #2 on: Jun 1st, 2011, 5:12pm »
Quote | Modify

Good one!
 
Thanks muddle!
offline
Jel
Board Newbie
*





   


Posts: 13
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #3 on: Jul 14th, 2011, 5:52pm »
Quote | Modify

I play a celtic harp, so here's some more on the instrument.
The original instument was wire-strung throughout, and is often called a clarsach.
The remaining small harps are reduced-range versions of the concert harp, with the distinction that losing the bass end of the latter, it also loses some of the sonority, making the small harp brighter in the upper registers.
As in guitars, the biggest distinction is in gut-strung and nylon-strung upper octaves, generally down to middle-C inclusive, after which concert harp wire strung (actually steel-wrapped floss with a thin steel core) take over. A very few harps made by Pilgrim for professional players take uncored bass strings, making a sound closer to the upper octave gut tone.
Three different tones can be obtained from a single string, "à la table", sounding very guitar-ish, normal tone, and harmonics on the half, third and quarter stops on the string, giving octave, octave-and-a-fifth, and two octave harmonics.
Damping is used to suppress unwanted harmonics when modulating chords, and in playing the wire-strung clarsach - increase the release to emulate this. The upper strings are solid phosphor-bronze, and are played with the nail, sounding plectrum-like. The amount of attack sonority is controlled by the amount of finger skin on the string, giving male players a weightier sound than female.
Welsh triple-harps are played by pulling aside the outer strings to play the semi-tones in the central row.
offline
muddle
Board Senior Member
****





   


Posts: 336
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique   harp_temp.mp3
« Reply #4 on: Jul 29th, 2011, 1:47am »
Quote | Modify

Hi Jel, as a harp player could you ( or anyone else interested)  identify the type of harp in the attached vaguely harp-like twiddlings?  
Its the sound from my keyboard, which disappointed me by not sounding very orchestral (to my ears.)
Could it be that they sampled a celtic harp .. or something  fairly small anyway?
 
David the muddle.
offline

You tube videos using HA or Virtual Singers:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheMuddleglum/videos
muddle
Board Senior Member
****





   


Posts: 336
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #5 on: Jul 30th, 2011, 5:52am »
Quote | Modify

Hmm.  If anyone was interested ,  please ignore the request for identification above.
   I found some mp3s of Celtic harps and they have a lighter tone than the attachment.   I  see what Jel means by a guitar-ish tone.  
 
 When I looked closer, my keyboard sound programmers had applied quite  a bit of  low pass filter.  
When I reduced this the sound become more pleasing  and  fairly Celtic-harp like.  
 
cheers David L.
 
 
 
offline

You tube videos using HA or Virtual Singers:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheMuddleglum/videos
Jel
Board Newbie
*





   


Posts: 13
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #6 on: Dec 11th, 2011, 12:19am »
Quote | Modify

Yup, that was a concert harp, probably Lyon and Healey, in your sample - you can hear sympathetic resonance way on down in the bass, and there's a lot of soundboard amplification from a big concert harp soundboard.
An earlier comment talked about the very slow decay - what's happening is that the power put into the strings is partly conserved in the octaves above and below (on a concert harp, as many as seven other strings) and they will not only continue to sound, but also restart sounding the strings you damped! Consequently, damping is important, and that depends on what's sounding - if it's pretty much just the string played, it can be damped with just a finger, but if you've been laying into florid chords, the beast can be pretty loud - second only to the Concert Organ - and it'll take both hands on full spread to damp the worst of it, as second and third harmonics spread (the technique for equal temperament tuning uses these harmonics to get to every note on the harp). I'd reckon that a well-tuned harp can ring for up to a minute, undamped, when a male's playing the chords. I've seen female players (Sioned Williams) use their entire forearm, the benefit of short sleeves. The technique is the same as the guitar Palm Mute, however.
« Last Edit: Dec 11th, 2011, 12:56am by Jel » offline
muddle
Board Senior Member
****





   


Posts: 336
Re: Orchestral Harp user instrument  -- as mentioned on Atelier Démocratique  
« Reply #7 on: Dec 11th, 2011, 11:25pm »
Quote | Modify

Thanks Jel, interesting.  I am quite impressed you can  suggest a maker for the harp!  
Have to say,  the more I learn about the challenges of playing real instruments the more I respect the amazing results musicians get.    
 
David.
offline

You tube videos using HA or Virtual Singers:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheMuddleglum/videos
Pages: 1  Reply | Notify of replies | Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »

« Myriad Forum » Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.1!
YaBB © 2000-2002,
Xnull. All Rights Reserved.

Top of page
Legal information Last update:  (c) Myriad